Category Archives: Traditional folk song

Gypsy Davy

You’d think a song about a woman leaving her husband and baby to live with a gypsy was an unsuitable subject for children. But we sang and loved it at school.

Posted in Traditional folk song | Tagged | Leave a comment

Tramps And Hawkers

I sang this Scottish song to my cycling companion when we were on our pleasant cycle ride from London to the Isle of Skye. Singing – and the frequent appearance of tramps and sundry odd folk – took our minds … Continue reading

Posted in Scottish, Traditional folk song | Tagged | Leave a comment

And A-Begging I Will Go

When I was a child tramps occasionally came by. None of them played fiddle. Rambling where you fancy was not always so carefree as our song would have you believe.

Posted in Traditional folk song | Leave a comment

A Fair Maid Was Walking

From my album Harbour Of Days.

Posted in Traditional folk song | Leave a comment

The Twenty-Fourth Of February

From W B Whall’s Sea Songs and Shanties, 1920. The ship is HMS Hercule.

Posted in Traditional folk song | Leave a comment

I Will Set My Ship In Order

This ancient night-visiting song has just a hint remaining of the supernatural. The ship is Eye Of The Wind from classic-sailing.co.uk.

Posted in Traditional folk song | Leave a comment

The Cuckoo’s Nest

Whatever the realities of everyday life English folksong is populated by lusty people enjoying an eternal spring.

Posted in Traditional folk song | Leave a comment

The Shepherd’s Daughter

From English Folk-Songs for Schools, collected by Sabine Baring Gould and Cecil Sharp. The story of an astute young woman and the song’s chorus, intrigued me as a boy and still pleases me.

Posted in Traditional folk song | Leave a comment

The Wiltshire Wedding

Everyone in our song is eager for a wedding, in contrast to Victorian society where proper ladies should not be enthusiastic. The one in our picture clearly shows reluctance bordering on distaste for the whole unpleasant business.

Posted in Traditional folk song | Leave a comment

Tom The Drover

For some reason barley is traditionally associated with ‘sport and play’ in folk song. The mother in this tale won’t hear of her daughter taking a walk over the fields with a local lad, but something changes her mind. That’s … Continue reading

Posted in Traditional folk song | Leave a comment